web analytics

Growing Kale.

Formerly considered garnish, this delicious and nutritious green is quickly gaining popularity. Unfortunately, 6 leaves can cost up to $1.99, offensively expensive for this highly productive crop. Kale can be prepared and preserved so many different ways. Baked as kale chips, stewed with ham, garlic and a dash of heavy cream or served in a hearty, grain free sauté with bacon and beans, kale graces our dinner table often. Easy to blanch and freeze, one packet of kale seeds can fill the freezer with all that is needed for the winter.

Kale is an excellent cool season or high altitude crop and can be planted early spring or late summer in long season areas. Fall plantings fare better with pests in warm climates, with Vates Blue Curled kale resisting insects better than Red Russian kale. Plant kale seeds directly into the garden 1/4″ to 1/2″ deep, 12″ apart in rows 2′ to 3′ wide and keep moist while growing. While kale can handle dry conditions occasionally, the flavor is better if not allowed to dry out. Kale prefers a loamy well drained soil and will perform well in garden towers or pots. Harvest from the bottom when leaves reach desired size and keep harvesting well into winter. Cold weather improves the flavor. It will tolerate light afternoon shade.

Good companion crops are beets, celery, cucumbers, dill, garlic, lettuce, mint, nasturtium, onions, potatoes, rosemary, sage, spinach, swiss chard. Bad companion crops are tomatoes, basil and strawberries.

Growing Kale.

Formerly considered garnish, this delicious and nutritious green is quickly gaining popularity. Unfortunately, 6 leaves can cost up to $1.99, offensively expensive for this highly productive crop. Kale can be prepared and preserved so many different ways. Baked as kale chips, stewed with ham, garlic and a dash of heavy cream or served in a hearty, grain free sauté with bacon and beans, kale graces our dinner table often. Easy to blanch and freeze, one packet of kale seeds can fill the freezer with all that is needed for the winter.

Kale is an excellent cool season or high altitude crop and can be planted early spring or late summer in long season areas. Fall plantings fare better with pests in warm climates, with Vates Blue Curled kale resisting insects better than Red Russian kale. Plant kale seeds directly into the garden 1/4″ to 1/2″ deep, 12″ apart in rows 2′ to 3′ wide and keep moist while growing. While kale can handle dry conditions occasionally, the flavor is better if not allowed to dry out. Kale prefers a loamy well drained soil and will perform well in garden towers or pots. Harvest from the bottom when leaves reach desired size and keep harvesting well into winter. Cold weather improves the flavor. It will tolerate light afternoon shade.

Good companion crops are beets, celery, cucumbers, dill, garlic, lettuce, mint, nasturtium, onions, potatoes, rosemary, sage, spinach, swiss chard. Bad companion crops are tomatoes, basil and strawberries.

Fruit, Vegetable, Herb & Flower Seeds in packets or by the pound

Burrell Seed Growers, LLC