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Growing Peppers.

Roasted red peppers, pickled jalapeño peppers, stuffed bell peppers, hot pepper relish and green chili to pour over my breakfast! They taste so good and grow so well, it is a main stay in our diets. Good thing too, because they are incredibly healthy. The flavor of our Mosco Chili Pepper, aka Pueblo Chili pepper, starts with a sweet, rich bite and brings on the heat after a few seconds. Amazing flavor and thick meat make it a must have in every warm climate garden. The Ancho or Pablano and the Giant Red Marconi peppers are perfect for stuffing. We have chilis with different heat levels and specialty peppers like Pepperoncini and Sweet Cherry peppers. Why grow one variety, when you can grow 5, 6 or more?

Peppers are a warm weather crop. They can be coaxed into a crop in cool weather areas with special care, but prefer hot, dry climates with timed irrigation. Peppers can be started inside. However, we have better results if we direct seed on our farm. This produces bigger and better quality peppers. Plant our heirloom pepper seeds, 1/2″ deep in flats or pots, 8 to 10 weeks before the last spring frost. It is imperative to keep a moist seedbed until seedlings are well established. Transplant outside when all danger of frost is past and soil temperatures reach 60º. Seedlings should be spaced 12″ to 18″ apart in rows 2′ to 3′ wide. When plants are 12″ tall, while cultivating, pull dirt around the base of the plant. This covers small weeds and gives the plant more support.

Note: Peppers may cross pollinate if too close together. Your sweets may become hot unless planted away from each other.

Good companion crops are basil, cilantro/coriander, onions and spinach. Bad companion crops are beans and kohlrabi.

Growing Peppers.

Roasted red peppers, pickled jalapeño peppers, stuffed bell peppers, hot pepper relish and green chili to pour over my breakfast! They taste so good and grow so well, it is a main stay in our diets. Good thing too, because they are incredibly healthy. The flavor of our Mosco Chili Pepper, aka Pueblo Chili pepper, starts with a sweet, rich bite and brings on the heat after a few seconds. Amazing flavor and thick meat make it a must have in every warm climate garden. The Ancho or Pablano and the Giant Red Marconi peppers are perfect for stuffing. We have chilis with different heat levels and specialty peppers like Pepperoncini and Sweet Cherry peppers. Why grow one variety, when you can grow 5, 6 or more?

Peppers are a warm weather crop. They can be coaxed into a crop in cool weather areas with special care, but prefer hot, dry climates with timed irrigation. Peppers can be started inside. However, we have better results if we direct seed on our farm. This produces bigger and better quality peppers. Plant our heirloom pepper seeds, 1/2″ deep in flats or pots, 8 to 10 weeks before the last spring frost. It is imperative to keep a moist seedbed until seedlings are well established. Transplant outside when all danger of frost is past and soil temperatures reach 60º. Seedlings should be spaced 12″ to 18″ apart in rows 2′ to 3′ wide. When plants are 12″ tall, while cultivating, pull dirt around the base of the plant. This covers small weeds and gives the plant more support.

Note: Peppers may cross pollinate if too close together. Your sweets may become hot unless planted away from each other.

Good companion crops are basil, cilantro/coriander, onions and spinach. Bad companion crops are beans and kohlrabi.

Fruit, Vegetable, Herb & Flower Seeds in packets or by the pound

Burrell Seed Growers, LLC