web analytics

Growing Rutabagas.

From the marriage of cabbage and turnips, the rutabaga was born. Also known as neeps, swedes or yellow turnips, this root crop is likely to have originated in Bohemia during the 17th century. It is grown for human consumption as well as animal fodder. My least favorite vegetable for years, it has become a holistic tool in my diet due to its’ antibacterial properties. One cup contains more than half of your vitamin C requirement for the day! Rutabagas host many healing benefits and should be grown for their long term storage properties as well. Fresh rutabagas cook quickly, but all too often they are old at the grocers and require more cooking time. Use them like potatoes. Mashed with cream and butter, it has a lovely golden color. Bake thin slices in a gratin. Oven roast bite sized cubes. My favorite is rutabaga stew, much like a potato chowder with bacon, celery, onion and cream. It is a hearty, healing meal.

Rutabagas are a cool season crop that sweetens after a couple of fall frosts. They can be grown very in early in spring, when soil temperature reaches 40º, but are best if grown as a fall crop in warm areas. Sow our heirloom rutabaga seeds 1/8″ to 1/2″ deep, 4″ apart in rows 12″ to 18″ apart. Rutabagas perform best with rich, well worked soil and a steady supply of water. Harvest when tennis ball sized or larger. The smaller ones are more tender and have better flavor. Like carrots, rutabagas can be heavily mulched and harvested into winter when needed.

Good companion crops are onions and peas. Bad companion crops are potatoes.

Growing Rutabagas.

From the marriage of cabbage and turnips, the rutabaga was born. Also known as neeps, swedes or yellow turnips, this root crop is likely to have originated in Bohemia during the 17th century. It is grown for human consumption as well as animal fodder. My least favorite vegetable for years, it has become a holistic tool in my diet due to its’ antibacterial properties. One cup contains more than half of your vitamin C requirement for the day! Rutabagas host many healing benefits and should be grown for their long term storage properties as well. Fresh rutabagas cook quickly, but all too often they are old at the grocers and require more cooking time. Use them like potatoes. Mashed with cream and butter, it has a lovely golden color. Bake thin slices in a gratin. Oven roast bite sized cubes. My favorite is rutabaga stew, much like a potato chowder with bacon, celery, onion and cream. It is a hearty, healing meal.

Rutabagas are a cool season crop that sweetens after a couple of fall frosts. They can be grown very in early in spring, when soil temperature reaches 40º, but are best if grown as a fall crop in warm areas. Sow our heirloom rutabaga seeds 1/8″ to 1/2″ deep, 4″ apart in rows 12″ to 18″ apart. Rutabagas perform best with rich, well worked soil and a steady supply of water. Harvest when tennis ball sized or larger. The smaller ones are more tender and have better flavor. Like carrots, rutabagas can be heavily mulched and harvested into winter when needed.

Good companion crops are onions and peas. Bad companion crops are potatoes.

Fruit, Vegetable, Herb & Flower Seeds in packets or by the pound

Burrell Seed Growers, LLC